A Family's Journey With Autism

Quotes about Children With Autism (34 quotes)
Last week, I focused on different points of view for what living with autism, or living with someone who's autistic is like, but this time will be somewhat similar and somewhat different. I decided to ask my family some questions pertaining to living with my brother, and here is what they had to say.

First, I spoke with my mom:

1. How do you feel about Joshua, from the time he was diagnosed to the present?
Answer:
"It's been a journey of devastation, denial, healing, acceptance, and then just love that you can't quite understand. The disability becomes secondary to the love that it brings into your every day life. It required a lot of sacrifice and planning that was no longer aligned with the dreams and aspirations we had, but love changes what our selfish hearts wants. So it becomes about the more vulnerable of us. Spiritually, it puts us in a place where we're drawn closer to Christ because He made those sacrifices for us, so now we understand what it's like to make those sacrifices for others. So believe it or not, putting it in that perspective, the journey becomes a lot easier."
2. How has living with an autistic person impacted your life?
Answer:
"It made me forget about what I wanted, what I thought the world to be, everything. It changes your entire perspective on life. Life is no longer about my selfish ambitions. It's about someone else, and how to make the best out of a difficult situation."
3. What's one thing you'd like everyone to know about autism?
Answer:
"That you have to pray about it, give it to God, accept the outcome, and make and create an atmosphere where your family is surrounded by Christ-like love so the child is not viewed as a curse, but a blessing and someone who's a part of our journey."

Next, I spoke with my dad.

1. How do you feel about Joshua, from the time he was diagnosed to the present?
Answer:
"I feel cheated. It's not fair that I've done everything right, and then to have your only son diagnosed with a disability, it makes you question your faith and your beliefs. But I am grateful for the lessons and skills my son has taught me, like patience, determination, how to overcome challenges."
2. How has living with an autistic person impacted your life?
Answer:
"It has altered almost all the plans for the future. It has made me re-prioritize what my future would be now. It's neither negative nor positive, it's just that the values I placed on things have now been shifted that I provide for him, both while I'm here and when I'm gone. Like, when my kids grew up, I imagined that I'd be fishing or golfing for my retirement, but that has changed. I have to take care of my son's future."
3. What's one thing you'd like everyone to know about autism?
Answer:
"Be respectful to others when you see them with autistic children. Autism changes the life of everyone it touches."

Last, I spoke to my sister.

1. Is there anything you would change about Joshua, like him being a normal kid? Why?
Answer:
 "No, I wouldn't. It's how God made him. Obviously, I'd like to hear him say I love you, but some things can't change, and Joshua is fine the way he is."
2. How has living with an autistic person impacted your life?
Answer:
"Because of Joshua, our (as in my sister and I) bond is inseparable. Anything we do impacts him, so we have to maintain a close relationship, which I'm okay with."
3. What's one thing you'd like everyone to know about autism?
Answer:
"That they're unique and gifted."

I asked the same questions to my parents because they were really relatable, but at the same time, I knew the answers would be different. Next week, or in the next few days, I will discuss what life is like for me when you've got an autistic sibling. Stay tuned!

What did you think of my family’s testimonies? Did you have any questions for them? Comment down!!

Check out my other autism-related posts:

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